Insights

Reasons why customers don’t like the translation agency experience

I come across a version of this statement so many times: “I have worked with so many translation agencies and my experience has been bad – I have given up on finding a good one that provides what we need.”  This kind of feedback is why we started Lyngual. There are reasons for the feeling of “they don’t get me” most of which can be fixed – that’s what we did. 

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Cultural differences in translation and how to deal with them

Language is closely tied to culture, which makes it important to not only consider the target language but also the target culture of the country of publication. In English, we are aware of the differences between for example American and British English, which ranges from different expressions for the same concept (e.g. elevator vs lift) to colloquial expressions and idioms that may not exist in in other countries besides the one where the term originated.

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Cultural differences in translation and how to deal with them bu

Language is closely tied to culture, which makes it important to not only consider the target language but also the target culture of the country of publication. In English, we are aware of the differences between for example American and British English, which ranges from different expressions for the same concept (e.g. elevator vs lift) to colloquial expressions and idioms that may not exist in in other countries besides the one where the term originated.

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GPT-3

GPT-3 is extremely interesting for the future of the language and content community. We take a look at the technology behind GPT-3, its use cases and future.

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Translator Rate Squeeze

The profession of translator is thousands of years old and has been around almost as long as written language exists. But the times where the job was treated fair is long gone - or is it?

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3 Things to bear in mind when translating between German and English

It is commonly known that German assigns grammatical gender to every noun, marked by the definite articles ‘der, die, das’ or the indefinite articles ‘ein / eine’. Whilst this in itself may cause non-natives to struggle with writing in German, it usually does not cause any issues with translations into English.

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